Christiaan

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About Christiaan

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    Vectorworks Veteran

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  • Occupation
    Architectural Technologist
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    needleandmortar.com
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    London

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  1. Lack of archaic file management. This is a gigantic advantage in my opinion. File management is an anachronism and one of the biggest sources of time wasting in our office. The only step you ever have to take before doing work in Onshape as far as I can see is to log in and click on your project. Version control built right in, again without file management. Show me a desktop app that does this as smoothly as Onshape. The developers manage the hardware and software. No need to manage a server, no need to manage desktop software, no need to manage updates, no need to deal with any problems relating to these management tasks. No need for expensive hardware too. Agro-free working in teams. Again no file management, none of the stupid hoops we have to jump through when Project Sharing goes wrong, as it does at least every week for us. Constant incremental software updates in the background. Much easier to deal with than large annual changes IMO. Can use any device with a web browser and an internet connection anywhere in the world to access and work on your projects. Sharing data is incredibly smooth. Again no files to manage. You just give people access. It's like everybody in the world having a copy of a smooth running Vectorworks on all their devices, with all the files they need to access built in. And as far as I can see, they're more nimble, they can develop faster. They can concentrate on innovations (like tech support right inside the app) because their foundation is standards based web technology and they control the hardware. They don't have to reinvent the wheel all the time, they can concentrate on getting CAD out of the way of designing. As for security, all our files are on a server connected to the internet (which I manage myself). So I don't see Cloud CAD as particularly less secure, unless you have projects so sensitive that you keep them on computers that aren't connected to the internet. Everyone's data is centralised so hackers only need to target one entity but the main security problem I can envision is that sharing data is so easy that someone might give access to the wrong person by mistake. The main downsides I see are: 1. You always need an internet connection to work 2. You don't have full control of your data, so if Onshape's systems go down you're have a serious problem
  2. Actually I've just deduced that the problem we had today was Project Sharing. Changes in a Working File weren't getting pushed to the Project File. But I was blaming it on WGR because one Project File is WGR'd into another and it seemed like WGRing was the culprit. Then I look at Cloud CAD; it has the same capabilities (Project Sharing and Workgroup Referencing) but they're built in at a much lower level so not only are they less likely to go wrong but if it does go wrong you're not poking around in a file system (with all the potential pitfalls and mistakes that entails in itself).
  3. I didn't realise it was hyped. I'm just looking at Onshape and thinking that's how I want my CAD to work.
  4. That's more akin to Project Sharing. This is probably more like WGRing. This is the part of Vectorworks that has caused me the most problems over the years, right up to this very day. I'm curious if this is a part of Onshape that can cause problems?
  5. @digitalcarbon is there any equivalent to workgroup referencing in Onshape?
  6. But where is the software management friction for a cloud-based CAD user? But computers that can drive CAD in a web browser far outweigh computers that can drive Vectorworks etc.
  7. But there would still be friction for the user. Even if it could be done in the background with no user interaction there would still be the possibility that the user has to manage some process if the update goes wrong. With cloud-based incremental updates there is always zero management friction for the user. Desktop software developers could learn from cloud-based software and integrate some of advantages, but it's the many little things that add up to the whole that they'll never be able to fully implement.
  8. True enough but that fear validly comes from a desktop software paradigm. I would be far more confident of incremental software updates released on the basis that they're ready rather than major updates released on because an annual release day has arrived. In principle there's also not much stopping a cloud-based software provider from offering the ability to choose which version you log into.
  9. Guys, what the hell is B-Thing?
  10. Nice Matt. There should be somebody at Vectorworks whose full-time job it is to constantly trawl through VW and do this sort of UI analysis.
  11. Ah yes, I see what you mean, knowing about the imitations of Edit In-Place ahead of time would certainly have saved me some time and headaches. Yes, that's my guess too. That assumption was just to illustrate a point. Yes agreed. I know that they are interested in seeing files that push all-in-one to its limits, so if you have files that like that send them to VW and tell them what the problems are. Come to think of it I must to that myself too.
  12. Thanks guys, bug submitted.
  13. It's superior in every way except if a file gets so big that navigation and modelling become cumbersome. There comes a point where you have no choice but to break the file up (you'll know when), but we've only reached that once, and that's because we're dealing with a model the size of Oxford in the UK. Every other active project we have are all in one file and happier for it. I understand, I often have these complaints, but if you were head of Vectorworks development and you had a choice between releasing Edit Section In-Place or waiting another year or two until it was compatible with WGRing, what would you do? I don't think the answer is always obvious. Resources are limited, so adding all desired features and improvements at once would break the laws of nature. Therefore compromises always need to be made. All things considered I'm happy that Edit Section In-Place was added to v2018 despite it not working with WGRed files. Edit Section In-Place has turned out to be one of our biggest time savers (despite it being slow to enter and exit the mode) In fact it pushed us to have another go at keeping everything in one file and that's saved us a lot of time compared to managing WGRs.
  14. Yes, landing is part of the stair. This is not the top step and nor does deactivating top riser seem to help. Test file attached if you'd like to have a swing at it. test-file.vwx
  15. Yes, Sheet Layers only live in the referenced files. However, since then, we've done a turnabout and we now try to keep everything the same file. We only start splitting into multiple files if the project becomes big enough to start slowing VW down. The reason for this is partly to do with the inconvenience and some historic bugs relating to WGRing, but the straw that broke the camels back is that Edit Section In-Place only works if your Section Viewports are in the same file as your model Design Layers.