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jwatson4

Sloping Floors

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Please forgive if this has been answered somewhere before. 

 

Sloped floors, for auditoriums and sanctuaries, how do yall do this? 

 

What I've been doing is drawing the floor using the polygon tool, extruding just a couple of inches, then switching to side views and rotating the floor into the slopes I need. I've also drawn the slope from a building elevation and extruded left/right (from top view). Both of these methods have worked, but they both have downsides. The first one being, I get weird rotations if the solid is oddly shaped and so only certain corners are coming down, in the situation where flat - slope - flat - slope I get weird intersections between pieces. It's just not a clean look. The second method usually has a bunch of floor sticking out of the sides of the building due to the way I extruded and most auditoriums/sanctuaries are narrower at the stage than at the back.

 

I do not draw for construction/architecture. I redraw on top of previously drawn plans for finish work (acoustics). The floor does not have to be a proper slab or anything like that. I'm just wondering if there is a slicker way to do this or a way that will produce better-looking renders and sheet views.  

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@jwatson4 I'm not sure about that since I've never done it, but you might want to use a nurbs-curve to follow the outline of your room, and then create a nurbs,surface out of it, and then thicken it. All these tools can be found in the nurbs-tool pallette.

 

Again I'm not sure if this is gonna work or not.

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If it's the same section right across the space, I'd draw the section through the floor and extrude it horizontally. Then I'd draw the outline of the space in plan, and extrde that vertically. The stepped/sloped floor slab would then be the intersection of those two solids.

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10 hours ago, Phileas said:

@jwatson4 I'm not sure about that since I've never done it, but you might want to use a nurbs-curve to follow the outline of your room, and then create a nurbs,surface out of it, and then thicken it. All these tools can be found in the nurbs-tool pallette. 

 

Again I'm not sure if this is gonna work or not.

I'd go with this.

 

In plan view draw a polygon for the back or the room

Duplicate it and drag it to the front of the stage and modify it to suit (keep the same number of vertices)

Select both >Modify convert to Nurbs

Ungroup

Modify>3d Move the first Nurbs ? in the Z direction as needed.

3d Modelling Toolset - Loft (Create Solid)

If you need to add thickness you can do so using Shell in the 3d Modelling Toolset.

 

image.thumb.png.0ec3d24b0ea12807a3c0258613629121.png

 

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^ won't the Shell command add thickness perpendicular to the sloping surface, rather than in the Z direction, though, meaning that the edges of the slab don't meet vertical walls properly?

 

(I think this is why some favour using roof faces)

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True- but you can shell up or down (-inside in the OIP)

The shell edges can interest the walls & you can then subtract the walls from the shell if you need that level of fidelity.

image.thumb.png.91398bebe011db88149a0771d030ac52.png

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We have also done this by creating a nurbs surface for say the bottom side, duplicating this and moving it up the required thickness, then using the Loft Surface tool to create a solid.

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6 hours ago, BG said:

We have also done this by creating a nurbs surface for say the bottom side, duplicating this and moving it up the required thickness, then using the Loft Surface tool to create a solid.

 

👍

 

Especially for radius auditorium orchestra rakes.  Then use the Create Auto Hybrid to get a 2D surface.

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Hey thanks, everyone, I'm gonna try all these ways to see which is fastest and easiest for me. I've got a bit of downtime at work so I can spend some time playing around with these different methods. most of the time I have no issues with my technique but last week I encountered a floor that was a bit of a hassle so I wanted to see what other ways this could be done. 

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