Jump to content

Luka Stefanovic

Vectorworks, Inc Employee
  • Posts

    74
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation

73 Excellent

2 Followers

Personal Information

  • Occupation
    Architecture Industry Specialist
  • Location
    United Kingdom

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Hi @Samuel Derenboim let me try and answer this question: There are several prescribed methods to accurately determine a compound material R-value taking thermal bridging into account. One of those is called Isothermal Planes method, and uses lambda values of individual materials within the compound and applies percentages to obtain the lambda value of the compound material. This method is described by ASHRAE and is what Vectorworks uses to calculate compound material lambda values and it works well for timber studwork and masonry, bit less so for metal studwork which needs a complex modelling assessment to get accurate lambdas or R-values. If that's what you need and the Isothermal planes method is not precise enough, you have the option of doing manual calculations separately for those wall assemblies and inputing that R-value in the Insertion tab of the Wall settings instead of using the automatic calculation. Interior and exterior surface resistance (air film layer) is automatically taken into account - you can actually see those if you go to Edit List under Object Boundary Type in Energos section of Walls, Slabs and Roofs. These are constants depending on building element position and whether the thermal flow is upward, downward or horizontal so you just need to choose a correct option for each element. As a general comment on compound Materials, they provide you with a solution for multiple distinct materials within a single thickness component. Without them, there is no real way of handling something like insulated studwork. Using compound Materials allow accurate quantity take-offs for example, and embodied carbon assessments to include correct areas/volumes of each of these materials. Hopefully I've answered some of the queries, but as you said - it starts a productive discussion. Thanks for asking these great questions!
  2. Hi @Dan Ryder VECC won’t work in 2020 because it’s based on Materials and quantity take-offs that haven’t really been possible before we introduced Materials. Vectorworks 2021 version is available as a standalone file to download but it has limited functionality as a first iteration of the calculator. Full version has been included since 2022 and can be found in preformatted worksheets.
  3. Hi @Christian Fekete These values are calculated automatically, but the Spaces need to be auto-bounded to Walls and also the Walls with Windows/Doors inserted in them need to be checked as Exterior in Data pane of the Wall Settings. When both of those conditions are met, you will see the Glazing areas automatically calculated.
  4. @sixfootzero I've had a look and I presume the reason for this is that your model is at a very early stage where it's essentially a really well insulated box form an energy point of view - if you create a label, it gives out A+ rating! There are no windows in the model, so there is no solar gain and I think between good insulation and ventilation set to mechanical, that's probably more than enough to handle cooling. There is an actual cooling energy demand value, but it's very low, which means you need very little energy over a year to keep the set comfort parameters. Load is the cooling required at hottest period and I think it probably has a value, but it's smaller than two decimal places so it's not showing. Having said all that, if you go into advanced ventilation settings and into summer ventilation, then drop your overheating limit to say 73F, you'll start seeing cooling loads appear. Also, when the model starts developing further and you have glazing, then solar heat gains will also come into play and it will become a more realistic scenario with cooling loads becoming a much more prominent factor. Early stage assessment is useful for many reasons, but it's crude based on what information is provided to the model and should be taken with a good chunk of salt!
  5. @sixfootzero It could be a number of things - it's hard to tell like this. Have you checked U-values/R-Values of the Building elements (Doors/Windows, Walls, Slabs, Roofs)? Are you using Spaces to give you areas and volumes? Also under advanced set of parameters you should include the cooling system, and potentially check advanced ventilation settings to set overheating limit. Just a few things off the top of my head, let me know if it still doesn't work and it would be best if I have a look at the model in that case.
  6. @Tom W. I'm still not sure why some of the Windows won't show if the Space doesn't have the projection towards it - though if you set the boundary of the Space to Auto-boundary, it creates those automatically and the worksheet will display everything correctly. The trick with the Door is to uncheck 'Show 3D open' as that only shows the Space the Door is opening into.
  7. Hi All, Delighted to say that VECC is now available for download - you can find the link here: https://university.vectorworks.net/mod/page/view.php?id=2508 Please let me know your thoughts and feedback, it would be very useful in the further development of the tool. A webinar on the topic is in plan, but I'm happy to schedule some time to go through how VECC works. Happy Embodied Carbon calculations!
  8. Hi All, Delighted to say that VECC is now available for download - you can find the link here: https://university.vectorworks.net/mod/page/view.php?id=2508 Please let me know your thoughts and feedback, it would be very useful in the further development of the tool. A webinar on the topic is in plan, but I'm happy to schedule some time to go through how VECC works. Happy Embodied Carbon calculations!
  9. There will be resources released in due course, for now I just wanted to share that it's out there and working! For now you can get in touch with me directly for more information and a demo before this is fully released.
  10. You're right - most importantly I think those objects would be Windows and Doors. They are accounted for in the calculator separately, based on few inputs added to Data pane in Door/Window settings, where you would input glazing and frame material. In short, any other object could be added in a similar fashion, but just off the top of my head I think ones used most often in architectural projects would be accounted for with Materials apart from those mentioned above. Also any free modelled geometry, such as Extrudes, Extrude Along Paths or Generic Solids will also have Materials.
  11. Hi everyone - apologies for the long silence but in short I wasn't too happy with what we had at the moment and wanted to have something more substantial before I emerge above the parapet. We’re happy to share that Vectorworks now has an integrated Embodied Carbon Calculator. Complementary with the Materials workflow introduced in 2021, it allows accurate reporting of quantities and assessment of Carbon Critical elements. The calculator uses the most comprehensive and industry standard guidance available in the UK AEC sector, as the foundation for the assessment methodology (RICS: Whole Life Carbon Assessment for the Built Environment,2017 and RIBA: Embodied and Whole Life Carbon Assessment for Architects, 2018). It also derives material Properties for Density and Embodied Carbon Coefficients from University of Bath Inventory of Carbon and Energy (ICE) Database V3, 2019. Further improvements are expected in the oncoming months as we add further automation. For more information and a demonstration of the calculator, please get in touch with me at lstefanovic@vectorworks.net
  12. Hi everyone - apologies for the long silence but in short I wasn't too happy with what we had at the moment and wanted to have something more substantial before I emerge above the parapet. We’re happy to share that Vectorworks now has an integrated Embodied Carbon Calculator. Complementary with the Materials workflow introduced in 2021, it allows accurate reporting of quantities and assessment of Carbon Critical elements. The calculator uses the most comprehensive and industry standard guidance available in the UK AEC sector, as the foundation for the assessment methodology (RICS: Whole Life Carbon Assessment for the Built Environment,2017 and RIBA: Embodied and Whole Life Carbon Assessment for Architects, 2018). It also derives material Properties for Density and Embodied Carbon Coefficients from University of Bath Inventory of Carbon and Energy (ICE) Database V3, 2019. Further improvements are expected in the oncoming months as we add further automation. For more information and a demonstration of the calculator, please get in touch with me at lstefanovic@vectorworks.net
  13. For structural framing I'd recommend using Structural Member tool. =LENGTH will give you the length of the member and you can use =CONCAT('StructuralMember'.'ProfileShape', ' ', 'StructuralMember'.'ProfileSeries', ' ', 'StructuralMember'.'ProfileSize') type of formula to concatenate the profile shape to show 'Wide Flange BSI (Universal Beams) 203 x 102 x 23' for steel profiles for example.
  14. To be perfectly honest @jmanganelli, I'm not sure. I'm not very familiar with either of the two standards, only PassivHaus. I don't know the requirements of LEED reports, it may be that there is no such value like the ones Energos results produce to compare against in those standards. We have set about to find out this with a case study one of my colleagues at Vectorworks is doing and will share those findings.
  15. I think you are spot on there @gester Energos really is a designed energy evaluation tool that taps into the architectural design process. It's not intended for energy certification and there are other software, often mandated, doing that job. Benefit of something like Energos is that you know where you stand before that certification process because you can check the building performance and how design changes affect overall results. Thanks for sharing the energy certificate document, very interesting to see the format.
×
×
  • Create New...