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trashcan

Worksheet Multiply Formula?

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To multiply, the formula should be =SUM(cell1*cell2) but when I press enter, nothing happens

 

How do I properly multiply two cells in a Vectorworks worksheet? 

 

To add, the formula should be =SUM(cell1,cell2), when I do that it works

 

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31 minutes ago, trashcan said:

To multiply, the formula should be =SUM(cell1*cell2) but when I press enter, nothing happens

 

How do I properly multiply two cells in a Vectorworks worksheet? 

 

Have you tried simply =B2*C2 ?

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@Nicolas Goutte well I didn't expect that it would work differently than every other spreadsheet application, but there you go! Works like a charm. Thanks

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1 minute ago, trashcan said:

spreadsheet application

Remember this is not a spreadsheet in the traditional sense. This is a database in a spreadsheet style format. You can make a Spreadsheet with a worksheet which will behave in a more familiar fashion, but then you won't necessarily be able to process the data from the file in the way that you can with a database.

 

I'm in danger of opening a can of worms.........!

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@markdd I'm using the Worksheet resource. Is there another way to use worksheets in the traditional sense in VWX? What magic is this?

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As I said. Its a can of worms!

 

When you create a worksheet from the resource manager you will create an empty spreadsheet. This behaves to all intents and purposes like a spreadsheet. However it has no data.

 

To add data from your file to it a row needs to be converted to a database row. That Row will then crunch data from your file. To do that you need to right-click on a Row header and select Database. From there you will get a criteria dialog which will ask you questions about the objects in the file. Say you have 3 objects in your file, then potentially three sub rows are created. Each row refers to each object.

 

(btw a database row has a diamond symbol in the header. A sub-row will be 1.1,1.2,1.3 etc.....)

 

The columns need to then interrogate the various parameters of those objects. It is the column headers where the formulas for doing that are placed. Back in the mists of time you would have to know the formulas to put in the column headers. Now there is the Edit Report command which will do that for you.

 

There are many more here who will surely elaborate on this (and probably correct me!)

 

Over and out!

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@trashcan Every spreadsheet I have ever used, starting with Visicalc in 1983 has allowed formulas like =A1*B1 or =A2+B3.  The Sum type functions are great when you want to work on a range of cells, but not necessary for a single cell.  In VW, =SUM only allows for addition.  =Sum(A1:Z1) would add up all the values in Row 1 columns A to Z. Much easier than =A1+B1+.....+Z1.

 

Now for an update on @markdd's can of worms. Elaborate maybe, but I don't think correct you ;-)

 

1. Worksheets can contain both Spreadsheet rows and Database rows.  Spreadsheet rows operate on only the data that is in that specific cell. Database rows use criteria to specify which objects from the drawing to create subrows (3.1, 3.2, etc.) for. Subrows can be SUMmarized to include more than one object in a single displayed subrow.

 

2. Beyond the basic math functions, most of the built in spreadsheet functions in VW will accept a criteria. If used in a spreadsheet cell, the criteria needs to be specifically stated. If used in a database row, the object(s) that are listed in the database row will automatically be passed to functions that require criteria. So in a spreadsheet cell you might use a formula like. =WALLAREA_GROSS((C='None') & (T=WALL)). While in a database row header cell you would only need =WALLAREA_GROSS.

 

3. Each subrow of a database will use the formulas in the header row and apply them to each object SUMmarized in the subrow. 

 

4. Formulas in either spreadsheet cells or database header row cells can access data in different cells by referencing the cell. If you want to use a reference to a different column you reference the header row cell.  So for a database in row 3 if cell C3 has a formula of =A3*B3, then in subrow C3.1 it will actually use the values in A3.1 and B3.1.  You can reference spreadsheet cells in a database row by just referencing the cell. So if you have a "constant" in spreadsheet cell A1, then in database row C3 you could have a formula of =A1*B3. This would result in subrow C3.1 being equivalent to =A1*B3.1

 

Lots of other gotchas, but hopefully this will help wrap your head around what spreadsheets can do.

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@Pat Stanford I'm with you on 4! The other three leave me a little confused TBH. Seems like a good opportunity for VWX university ! 

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OK, let's take this one step at a time. And work backwards. So starting with number 3 (and I guess part of #1).

 

Do you understand Database Rows? For a database row you right click on the row header (it can be any row, but I always use 3 as my example. It leaves a couple of blank rows above in case I need to add a title and labels.) and choose Set Criteria. You then use the criteria builder to set the criteria so that only the objects you want to report are displayed. Criteria include things such as layer, class, object type, record attached, value in a Record.Field, Color, Fill Pattern, etc.

 

Any formula you put into a cell in the database header row (3, not 3.1, 3.2, etc.) will be applied to the objects in each subrow and the result displayed in the subrow. A formula of =L will display the Layer the object is on. =C will display the class the object is in. =N will display the name of the object. And then there are all of the Worksheet Functions for displaying things like wall or component area or volume.

 

Since often there are a lot of similar or identical objects in a drawing, a Database Row can be SUMmarized based on the criteria of any column. If you click on the disclosure triangle in the header row cell and check the SUMmarize check box, objects that have identical criteria in that column will be SUMmarized into a single subrow. Columns that have identical data for every SUMmarized item will display that value. Columns that have SUMmarized items with different values will show as a dash.

 

For numerical values, there is a second check box option under the column disclosure triangle called "Sum Values". When that box is checked for a column (it does not matter if the column is SUMmarized or just displaying data based on a different SUM, then the individual values for each object SUMmed will be displayed.

 

Another trick with SUMmarized values is to use a formula in the database header row of =COUNT. This will return the total number of objects that have been SUMmarized into each displayed subrow.

 

If your head has not exploded yet ask again and I can try to do a better explanation of #2 or answer any questions this thread has brought up so far.

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18 hours ago, Nicolas Goutte said:

 

Have you tried simply =B2*C2 ?

 

Well, I did not start with VisiCalc like @Pat Stanford did, but I had the chance to use one day Multiplan. (Otherwise I have really started with old Excels, the successor.)

 

However for me too, it is standard not to use SUM. I am not sure that using =SUM(B2*C2) would work on such old spreadsheet (e.g. old Excel) either, as if I remember well (but only very vaguely), SUM needed at least 2 parameters.

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