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JHAM

VW 2018 and Door Hinge Markers

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Just downloaded 2018 and I am migrating over..

Tell me if I am missing something, but I cannot get the Door Hinge Markers to show up as dashed line type in an elevation (hidden line render).   In the door preview, the default preview render mode is Wireframe, and the dashed line shows up correctly. As soon as I switch to Hidden Line, it becomes a solid line.

 

I use a class type for the hinge marker and have tried various line types, but I cannot get any of them to show up as anything but a solid line.  Anyone else having this issue?

 

Don't want to complain too much, because my biggest pet peeve with previous versions (detail callout) was resolved!

 

J

 

 

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@JHAMHi, to change the marker to dotted untick this box. (This is 2016 am still waiting for the AUS/NZ release)

HTH

If you use hinger marker class attribute you can have any type of line you wish. See attached.

 

Capture.JPG

Edited by Alan Woodwell

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@JHAM Alan's right, unchecking this option will fix your immediate problem.

 

But I think there's still a bug when using the Class attributes option that causes the line to be solid in Hidden Line render. Rendering in OpenGL using this option is fine, for instance.

Edited by Christiaan
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On 9/19/2017 at 1:46 AM, JHAM said:

Just downloaded 2018 and I am migrating over..

Tell me if I am missing something, but I cannot get the Door Hinge Markers to show up as dashed line type in an elevation (hidden line render). 

I'm certainly missing something since I don't understand the need for this. A non-professional client does not understand the obscure and funny hinge marker anyway and surely the professionals use door schedules in combination with floor plans. Industry practices of course vary.

Edited by Urbanist
Typos fixed

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11 minutes ago, Urbanist said:

A non-professional client does not understand the obscure and funny hinge marker anyway

 

A key/legend solves that problem.

 

12 minutes ago, Urbanist said:

and surely the professionals use door schedules in combination with floor plans.

 

Forcing people to look at plans to know the swing of a door is lazy drafting, especially when you have a 3D model as a single source of data. It's not just door schedules either. Window schedules have doors in them.

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13 hours ago, Alan Woodwell said:

Capture_01.JPG.be00bcd304d98eedd0269eb1612624a1.JPG

Capture_002.JPG

@Alan Woodwell

This is the step that is no longer working in 2018, the marker refuses to use the line type of the set class.

Your other suggestion is great -- I'll use that for now until the bug is resolved.

 

Cheers!

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4 hours ago, Urbanist said:

I'm certainly missing something since I don't understand the need for this. A non-professional client does not understand the obscure and funny hinge marker anyway and surely the professionals use door schedules in combination with floor plans. Industry practices of course vary.

You're right that clients do not usually understand this at first, but they are teachable and some catch on fairly quickly. Either way, a client's perceived understanding shouldn't dictate how we do our work/drawings. The hinge markers give an added layer of information in elevations -- sometimes elevations can read a little flat without them. They also are a signal that that rectangle in my drawing is definitely a door and cannot be mistaken for something else.    Contractors need all the help they can get.

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5 hours ago, Christiaan said:

 

A key/legend solves that problem.

Keys and legends are a sign of poor drafting.

5 hours ago, Christiaan said:

 

Forcing people to look at plans to know the swing of a door is lazy drafting, especially when you have a 3D model as a single source of data. It's not just door schedules either. Window schedules have doors in them.

 

One of the first things I learned was not to draw anything that does not have relevant information value or is shown elsewhere in a more appropriate or detailed way. The swing of a door in  an elevation is irrelevant, especially when we have a 3D-model that can show doors opened or shut. That is how one communicates to non-professional clients in this century. In my country, the door schedule is the legally binding document in this respect. No matter what you have in plans or elevations, industriously drafted, the doors that are delivered are those in the schedule. 

 

 

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54 minutes ago, Urbanist said:

Keys and legends are a sign of poor drafting.

 

Keys and legends are a cornerstone of clear communication. Some of us can't assume that a reader (professional or not) knows which way arrow markers are pointing, whether to the hinge side or the handle side. One of the clearest ways to communicate this is a graphic legend.

 

59c297950edb3_ScreenShot2017-09-20at17_28_50.png.9be29d15f55e4a8a3365383a5bcb72aa.png

 

54 minutes ago, Urbanist said:

The swing of a door in an elevation is irrelevant

 

It's quite relevant in this elevation

59c297b5414af_ScreenShot2017-09-20at17_29_11.png.44ea690e9f5a123ba5ce0ed24b29de81.png

 

54 minutes ago, Urbanist said:

especially when we have a 3D-model that can show doors opened or shut

 

Totally irrelevant to most of the window manufacturers we work with

Edited by Christiaan

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10 hours ago, Christiaan said:

 

59c297950edb3_ScreenShot2017-09-20at17_28_50.png.9be29d15f55e4a8a3365383a5bcb72aa.png

 

 

It's quite relevant in this elevation

59c297b5414af_ScreenShot2017-09-20at17_29_11.png.44ea690e9f5a123ba5ce0ed24b29de81.png

Fair enough, but no window manufacturer I have ever worked with needed such a representation. A diagram with single lines, dimensions and references to details or standards was enough. But as I said, industry practices vary and my main experience is from manual drafting in the 1970s and buildings with hundreds of windows usually following a typology. I have no idea of a workflow in which submodels such as your example can be reliably extracted from the building model, where one of course determines the dimensions and swings, but no-one wants such ugly lines in the elevation drawings. And speaking of details: I and my colleagues worked often very hard to find suitable steel profiles from manufacturers' catalogues, only to learn that the ones we chose could not be used for one reason or another. 

 

10 hours ago, Christiaan said:

 

Totally irrelevant to most of the window manufacturers we work with

 

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