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Ron Kwaske

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  • Occupation
    Architect
  • Homepage
    www.Kwaske.com
  • Location
    United States

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  1. I had a similar issue with baseboard. I like to to show it in elevation, section, and 3d; but certainly not in plan. So, rather than trying to constantly find the class that it is on an turn it on or off; I wrote a script that toggles it on or off. I keep a small script pallet of my most used scripts always floating on top of my workspace to increase efficiency (I titled the pallet 'Quick'). Admittedly, there is one step of double clicking it as you change views; however, I have grown to really like the flexibility of it. You could modify the script so that if you double click it from a custom view, it goes into plan view and shuts off the classes you don't want (siding & GWB), double click it again and it turns the classes back on and initiates the flyover tool. Just a thought..
  2. Make your own door and save it as a symbol. (They will look better.)
  3. For a schematic- use a 3d polyline and then 'extrude along path' with the desired diameter. For more detailed DWV work, I have 3d symbols for most cast iron / pvc fittings and I extrude lengths of various sized pipe.
  4. You might consider creating a custom Record Format along with a custom Data Tag to recognize it- the data can then be extracted to a worksheet. I would recommend creating unique symbols for each product along with the custom data tag already attached. Any data that needs to be modified is then done in the Data section of the object info pallet after the symbol has been placed. I've been successfully doing with this doors, hardware, and lighting components (its a laborious process, but so far, worth it because I can provide a lot of pertinent information that the contractor will actually read and use.)
  5. One way I found to get around the 'confusing aspect' of using stories & level type is to create a spreadsheet to help simplify the math. I use stories with a finished floor level (FF) and a Joist Bearing level. On the left side of the spreadsheet, enter desired floor to ceiling heights, along with the thickness of the floor/ceiling assembly. On the right, it gives me all of the elevations I need to enter. (I also custom build the stairs instead of using the stair tool, so I have the spreadsheet calculate that as well - shown bottom right).
  6. The problem here, for me anyway, is not that Vectorworks is not currently compatible with Mojave; or that some of us have upgraded to Mojave without realizing the incompatibility- It is Vectorworks' failure to communicate. If Vectorworks can send an email notifying me that 2019 is here and available; it also could have sent an email urging users not to upgrade to Mojave.
  7. Concur. I am in a similar boat: either use an old computer in the back of my office; or wipe my entire HD, downgrade, and start over (which is another day of lost productivity).
  8. I upgraded my laptop to Mojave this morning only to find that both Vectorworks 2018 and 2019 are not compatible. It never occurred to me to check the Vectorworks forums to verify compatibility; and frankly, I should not have to. A simple email from Vectorworks with their recommendation not to upgrade to Mojave at this time would have curtailed this problem. Now, I have to either not use my new MacBook Pro until a Service Pack comes out; OR, find a way to revert back to High Sierra, which appears to be much easier said than done.. Very, very disapointed.
  9. A lot of symbols have objects within the symbol on a class called 'None.' Double click the symbol and review or edit both the 2d and 3d component. You might even consider changing the class for better control.
  10. The ability to lock an entire class from the Navigation palette (perhaps next to the visibility option?) would be useful.
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