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herbieherb

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About herbieherb

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  1. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    Most of the drawers i know can't go back to one screen if they worked on two. I also wouldn't trade a 28 incher for my two 24 inchers. Most likely you are right and HD resolution appears on a 28 inch screen already some fizzy. The reason why i don't buy any more 28 inchers but only 24 is the better layout of Vectorworks on two screens. And with two hd screens, even a mid-range graphics card can handle it well. What I also find very interesting for CAD are the ultrawide screens. Unfortunately, they are still very expensive at the moment. I hope they get cheaper soon.
  2. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    I would also consider buying two HD monitors instead of the 4K monitor. This gives you a better arranged working area at half resolution. It costs much less and will perform a lot better especially on cheaper graphics cards. This is how Vectorworks looks like on two HD screens:
  3. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    Here you can see the finished computer... and its ventilation scheme:
  4. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    The error was recently confirmed to me by the (german) support. They could reproduce the whole thing, but couldn't tell when it would be fixed.
  5. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    Sometimes only single pixels would be miscalculated and sometimes a memory-error leads to a crash. ECC is actually made for a system to do faultless calculations over a very long period of time. Basically, the longer a calculation takes, the more precise it should be and the more memory you need for it, the sooner you use ECC. What I noticed with several rendertasks is that the memory is not completely freed after each rendering. There's been a memory-leak in Renderworks for years. Depending on memory usage I can only do 5-10 renderings before the memory is full. Vectorworks will not crash, but more renderings will take forever.
  6. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    Looks like it depends on the way we use our Rendermachines. Memory errors are relatively rare. On a typical render computer it happens about every three days that a wrong bit comes out. So if someone doesn't run the computer overnight, they will have it about once a week. If you're lucky, it has no effect on the current task. If you're unlucky, it leads to a crash. If you don't run the computer 24/7, you may have a crash about once a month due to memory-error. Of course, it looks different if you render overnight, then one crash really sucks, because you lose a whole day's time. In my work I rarely have renderings that last more than an hour and I practically never render overnight. A crash a month is bearable for me if I have 20% more performance.
  7. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    Since ECC modules are not geared for performance and the threadripper profits really a lot from fast latencies and clock rate i wouldn't buy ECC for this build. Besides I have never been able to safely trace a renderworks crash back to a memory error before. With render-tasks i'd rate performance over safety. The only issues I have regularly, happen when I do multiple renderings and the RAM fills up completely because of memory leaks.
  8. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    Every year I assemble several computers optimized for Vectorworks and upgrade older systems. This year we decided on only one new building, which cost about twice as much as our usual computers. This computer should be optimized for fast rendering with renderworks, but should also work properly with very large/detailed projects in OpenGL and 2D mode. Elsewhere I promised you a report about this computer. So here he it is. The whole system looks like this: CPU: AMD Threadripper 1950X (TR4, 3.40GHz, Unlocked) 1'030.– CHF GPU: MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X TRIO (11GB, High End) 911.– CHF Mainboard: AsRock X399 Taichi (TR4, AMD X399, ATX) 380.– CHF RAM: G.Skill Trident Z RGB F4-3200C14Q-32GTZRX (4x, 8GB, DDR4-3200, DIMM 288) 652.– CHF Cooling: Fractal Celsius S36 145.– CHF Case: Fractal Define R5 Black (Midi Tower) 143.– CHF Power Supply: Corsair RM750x (750W) 125.– CHF HDD1: WD Black (256GB, M.2 2280) 116.– CHF HDD2: WD Blue (2TB, 3.5", Desktop) 74.– CHF Total price (without assembly): 3576.– CHF (Daily prices in Swiss Francs at digitec.ch) CPU: AMD Threadripper 1950X (TR4, 3.40GHz, Unlocked) 1'030.– CHF A pleasure for rendering. In this price range anyway. The 16 cores come into their own in renderworks. Renderings, which take one hour for comparison computers with 4 core processors, are finished here in 15 minutes. Especially if you do a lot of test renderings it is an incredible comfort gain whether you wait almost 10min or a little more than 2min until the rendering is finished. In normal 2D operations you don't really notice the many cores. More operations are programmed with multi-core capability with each Vectorworks version. At the moment, however, one hardly notices anything of it. Conclusion: For all those who render often and in high quality brilliant. In 2D and OpenGL mode, however, you won't notice any difference. GPU: MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X TRIO (11GB, High End) 911.– CHF Can be easily overclocked thanks to the three coolers. Runs extremely quiet even under full load and with OC. My card runs stable with +65MHz GPU clock frequency and +750MHz memory clock. This indicates a boost GPU clock of 2012 MHz and 12528MHz memory clock (most programs show half the clock rate here, since DDR RAM). Maximum temperature under full load is still 60°C. But this is also where the greatest savings potential lies. In my opinion, the 1070 would have performed almost the same for the computer and my two HD screens. The 1080Ti has two advantages over the 1070: Faster/larger memory with double bandwidth: Large projects that need a lot of memory in OpenGL benefit from the fact that the OpenGL display is faster/flowier. However, the threadripper processor with its relatively slow single-thread performance seems to slow down OpenGL performance extremely. This only applies to OpenGL, with other engines the graphics card can sweat a lot, so with this system, too, it delivers maximum performance. Those who work at very high resolution (one or more UHD screens etc.) or make high-resolution OpenGL renderings will probably notice the difference between 1070 and 1080Ti also in Vectorworks, all others are already served with the 1070. Conclusion: for my two HD screens the cheaper GeForce GTX 1070 would have done the same. If I have time, I will swap the cards between the mentioned computers, see what it is exactly. Mainboard: AsRock X399 Taichi (TR4, AMD X399, ATX) 380.– CHF Very good value for a TR4 board, good equipment and very good performance in tests. RAM: G.Skill Trident Z RGB F4-3200C14Q-32GTZRX (4x, 8GB, DDR4-3200, DIMM 288) 652.– CHF Since the desired RAM was not available for a long time, I had various configurations running until the right RAM was finally delivered. So I can say: 1. buy at least 4 bars to use all available bandwidth (the Threadripper processor supports Quad-Channel, which should be used as well). The difference between two and four bars is about 20% processor power. 2. The Threadripper benefits enormously from low latencies and fast clock speeds. It is therefore worth investing in very expensive RAM. The difference between 4x2130MHz with 18-18-18 latencies and 4x3200MHz with 14-14-14 latency is again about 20% processor power. With the right RAM you can almost double the processor power. Saving money here would be a big mistake. The 400 CHF extra price compared to cheap RAM was the best money invested on the whole computer. Pay attention to the article numbers on the RAM - they are exactly the same. Only the article number (here F4-3200C14Q-32GTZRX) gives information about latencies, clock rate etc. At G.Skill the ones with the ending ZRX are optimized for the threadripper and much more expensive than the ones with the ending TZR. Cooling: Fractal Celsius S36 145.– CHF Since the processor emits an unusual 180 watts of pure heat, proper cooling is mandatory. AMD has certified extra cooling systems for the Threadripper, you can read on their site. Don't underestimate the cooling, the processor heats extremely under full load and Renderworks keeps the processor under full load in continuous operation. While rendering I have a heater under my desk. Wink I opted for the Fractal Celsius S36 compact water cooling system. Very easy to install, no tinkering, three fans for quiet operation. Make sure that the heat sink with three fans needs 40cm space on the housing. The housing therefore needs a correspondingly large air outlet. Case: Fractal Define R5 Black (Midi Tower) 143.– CHF Super equipment, enough space for compact water cooling. Wonderful well thought-out openings for the cable guide. Enough space for quite comfortable assembly. Only under the heat sink of the water cooling I had some trouble to plug in the connectors at the upper end of the mainboard. But left without complaining. Power Supply: Corsair RM750x (750W) 125.– CHF Very convenient to install, as all cables are also modular on the power supply unit, i.e. can be plugged in separately. At the end there is no superfluous cable clutter in the tower. HDD 1: WD Black (256GB, M.2 2280) 116.– CHF Faster and more expensive than a normal SSD because of the M.2 slot. But it pays off for the operating system and the programs. For data storage I have a normal second hard disk and most of the data is on our server. That's why the 256GB are short, but they are absolutely sufficient for my purpose. HDD 2: WD Blue (2TB, 3.5", Desktop) 74.– CHF Inexpensive and absolutely fast enough for storing large amounts of data for archiving. Why is the computer only half as expensive as an iMac Pro with comparable rendering performance (Vecotorworks/Renderworks)? On the one hand, the very high-quality screen is missing in my price list. On the other hand, not all the hardware on my computer had to be pressed into the narrow screen. This gives the hardware enough space for heat dissipation. In iMac Pro, the processor and graphics card have been throttled, and the RAM is clocked very slowly. My computer has very fast RAM, processor and graphics card are moderately overclocked. But the biggest cost driver for iMac Pro is the extremely expensive hardware, which Vectorworks users simply don't need. ECC RAM, for example, is essential for server applications, scientific calculations, etc., but without advantages for Vectorworks. The Xeon processor is top for multithreading, unfortunately it is clocked very slowly and even slower than the standard in the iMac Pro. The minimum 1TB SSD are great, a combination of a large conventional hard disk and a small (256,512MB) and fast SSD is simply much cheaper. The iMac Pro's professional graphics card is designed for work that fills the VRAM many times over. It has very much, very expensive, fast, VRAM built-in. In Vectorworks it's mostly idle, unless you render in OpenGL. For high res video editing, for example, the graphics card is indispensable. I don't want to talk down the computer. It is absolutely worth the money if you belong to the target group (scientists, video artists, etc.). You can't get a computer with truly comparable iMac Pro hardware cheaper anywhere. However, a computer with similar performance in Vectorworks costs only half the price. upshot For the projected task (as fast as possible Renderworks-Renermaschine) the computer is top. Coffee times have reduced noticeably. 😁 For OpenGL, however, we have stronger and much cheaper PCs in the office. At the expense of (in everyday work hardly noticeable) OpenGL performance you get 4 times the rendering speed. But the computer costs about twice as much as I would spend for a normal Vectorworks workstation. Translated with deepl.com
  9. herbieherb

    Pressing render tab on the OIP is still slow

    I solved the problem after I had opened and saved all my library files once. The problem is that otherwise the files will not have saved thumbnail images for symbols/textures etc if you don't open and save them manually. During the migration of old libraries the thumbnails are unfortunately not created.
  10. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    There are some differences between the GTX 1080 Ti of the different manufacturer. The differences are mainly in clock rate and cooling. This means the overall speed is different (+-5%). And some make more noise than others and may have better or worse cooling. The quality of the components also differs and finally there is often a huge difference in the price. Here is an example that lists some graphic cards with different framerates but the same graphics chip GTX 1080 Ti. Note that the original Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti is on the lower end of the list. You may have to read some tests to find out which card suits you best.
  11. herbieherb

    VELUX SKYLIGHTS FOR VW

    This is good to hear. Thx for the info. Im sorry i don't have the file where i can demonstrate. It appeared only once and i can't reproduce it since I copied the object into another file and back. It seems like the issue only occurs on very special configuration. If i notice it another time, i'll send you the file.
  12. herbieherb

    VELUX SKYLIGHTS FOR VW

    Also the tool recalculates the site model each time i change a value or move it.
  13. herbieherb

    VELUX SKYLIGHTS FOR VW

    I really like the tool. Unfortunately windows user can't open pages files. So the installation instructions should be a txt file. Also i'd love to choose a custom width and height. Velux also produces these windows with custom measures.
  14. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    Most graphic cards in this price segment are able to handle up to 4 or more displays (technically, not necessarily performance-related). Do consider that UHD displays need a way better graphic card than full-hd. Especially if you want to use two of them. Right now i use two Full-HD displays and im very happy with it (i will not change to UHD with my new built for good reasons). These two full-hd displays have 4'147'200 pixels, the two UHD already have 16'588'800 pixel. This means your graphic-card will have a hell lot more to do but you won't notice it in your final work. Your whole hardware would work only on showing you a great picture and it will not help you to handle a more detailed model. As you mentioned right, every system can be slowed down with 2D lines only don't bother this will also be possible with your new system. Just draw one single line and duplicate it 50'000 times (safe your work before you try). On the other hand if you draw the same amount of lines with a hatch this is no problem for vectorworks. So always try to draw with as less information as possible. This even means that good drawn 3D Models work sometimes smoother than chaotic and overloaded 2D drawings of the same work. With your built you will be able to handle veery complex drawings with vectorworks.
  15. herbieherb

    Asking Advice on custom built system

    I hope you will overclock your system a little. Otherwise you would'nt need the water cooling system. With the Asus board this will be very easy to do. If not you may consider if you realy need this expensive mainboard. In tests the ASRock X399 Taichi has (very little) better benchmark results (but it's not that well equipped) and costs about 200.- less. I just ordered the parts for a very similar system but took the ASRock X399 Taichi. With the saved money i got the Threadripper 1950X with 16 Cores. It means about 30% faster rendertime with renderworks. If you don't get the two Geforce GTX1080, you coul'd buy one GTX 1080Ti wich is a little faster (about 20%) than the GTX 1080 and has 3GB more VRAM. If you have the money you coul'd also buy an M.2 SSD instead of a SATA SSD. You will have a little faster loading/boot-up time. In my case I took a smaller but M.2 SSD. Here is the built i'm waiting for: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X TRIO AsRock X399 Taichi 2x Kingston HyperX Predator DDR4 16GB 3000MHz WD Black (256GB, M.2) Noctua Cooler NH-U9 TR4-SP3 Fractal Define XL R2 (Big Tower)
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