Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Donald Wardlaw

Stories and split levels

Recommended Posts

The design series manual says:

"The layer plane on one story cannot overlap with the layer on another story; therefore, the highest layer in a story cannot overlap with the lowest layer in the story above, and the lowest layer in a story must be higher than the highest story in the story below."

So, how does one do a split level model with a two story high area, a second story with a top layer (ceiling) at the same layer as the first, and a floor level between the first and second story with a top layer higher than both?

Thanks,

Donald

Share this post


Link to post

My understanding is that a split level is always associated with the story beneath it. It can never be a story of its own, but rather offset from it as an associated layer.

The ceiling in a two story space would be entirely associated to the upper story.

It's easier to think of a split level as a "mezzanine level" above the lower story.

Share this post


Link to post

"The layer plane on one story cannot overlap with the layer on another story; therefore, the highest layer in a story cannot overlap with the lowest layer in the story above, and the lowest layer in a story must be higher than the highest story in the story below."

Though this is true the fact remains that walls and other objects can be at any height you want on any Layer you want, the downside being that in some cases auto-bounding doesn't work. The biggest problem I believe is actually windows and doors and their representations in regard to plan vs elevations (I have often solved this by introducing window/door objects and placing them in a special 3D class allowing them to be shown/hidden in SLVPs according to what needs to be represented.

Share this post


Link to post
The design series manual says:

"The layer plane on one story cannot overlap with the layer on another story; therefore, the highest layer in a story cannot overlap with the lowest layer in the story above, and the lowest layer in a story must be higher than the highest story in the story below."

So, how does one do a split level model with a two story high area, a second story with a top layer (ceiling) at the same layer as the first, and a floor level between the first and second story with a top layer higher than both?

Thanks,

Donald

Split levels are possible, also the one you describe. I always recommend drawing out a section by hand real quick, and then determine the real stories you need. For these three real-life stories, you will use one in VW because of the overlap restriction. All the rest will be handle by level types, which is very easy to do. You will have more option bounding your objects to those level types. If you need any more help, just ask.

Share this post


Link to post

Thanks to all for the suggestions. I will have to noodle around with this a bit more. The idea to consider it all 1 story is interesting. As a test I was able to add another floor level in the story which I called "Intermediate Floor". So I think having multiple floors and multiple ceilings in a story may work.

Donald

Share this post


Link to post

For what it's worth, we haven't even messed with using "stories", and simply set our design layers at the respective "z". (Some of our designers are still using v2011, which doesn't even have "stories" anyway.) For split story houses, you can easily set design layers to overlap. If we were to do ten story buildings, then I could see some value in utilizing stories. But at the scale of a simple house, I'm not so sure it would ever prove to save any time, especially on a house with many levels occupying the same "z" but different "x" and "y" space.

Share this post


Link to post

I have to agree with Matt. Instead of going all MC Escher with trying to imagine how to construct your project using Stories, just build it from scratch and skip worrying about having the model adjust automatically to any change elsewhere. It won't take that much time move your elements manually unless, at Matt says, you are working on a much more complex commercial-type project.

The tool can't be more complicated than the task.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
I have to agree with Matt. Instead of going all MC Escher with trying to imagine how to construct your project using Stories, just build it from scratch and skip worrying about having the model adjust automatically to any change elsewhere. It won't take that much time move your elements manually unless, at Matt says, you are working on a much more complex commercial-type project.

The tool can't be more complicated than the task.

Tom

I can tell from experience that even for a small house, it's much easier to work with stories, because you don't have to remember all the heights and can just bound to your levels, which are named. This makes it much easier to design everything. You have less calculating to do.

Edit: It are the level types that are important, stories are just a container for these.

Edited by DWorks

Share this post


Link to post

I'm trying to do something similar to this, only not with half levels, just with some stepping down. Can anyone suggest any links/tutorials clarifying the process? Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

 

7150 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, Maryland 21046, USA   |   Contact Us:   410-290-5114

 

© 2018 Vectorworks, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Vectorworks, Inc. is part of the Nemetschek Group.

×
×
  • Create New...