Jump to content

Hello Community!

This Saturday, April 11, from 9am – 1pm EDT we will be performing maintenance on the Vectorworks Community Board. During this time, the site will be unavailable.

P Retondo

Member
  • Content Count

    1,710
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by P Retondo


  1. You can construct a fillet of given radius using basic geometry. Tangent arcs have the property that the two arc centers and point of tangency are co-linear. Thus, using the centers of the two arcs you wish to join, construct arcs that are the sum of the radius + fillet radius. Their intersection is the center of your fillet arc.

    0B2Nv6O2xIh9xT3F6XzhiQkoyenM?ths=true

    If you have a given point of tangency and not a given fillet radius, your problem is a bit more complex. Trig is required.


  2. This may not be the case for you, but I use a template where the drawing labels are in a "nonprint" class, which I change to "none" when the labels are needed. Sometimes if that class is turned off I forget the labels are there. Auto-numbering, however, does not forget they are there. Having said that, from the specifics provided it does seem like you are experiencing some kind of file corruption.


  3. The only way I've been able to do this is to create a texture from the image, framed with solid boundaries, then apply it to a NURBS surface and tweak the scale and offsets. It seems like there should be an easier way, but I don't know what it is. Applying an image to a "2D object on the 3D plane" (whatever that actually means) is possible, but that would have to be based on a 2D primitive, such as a rectangle, circle, etc. I would love to know a better way to accomplish what you are talking about.

    BTW, you can convert your cylinder to a group of NURBS surfaces with a simple command, then you can isolate which surface the texture applies to.


  4. Jim, after looking into it I can see that Python, though not directly compilable, is a programming language, not a macro language. This helps me adjust my approach to following the online demos - I need to stop thinking in C++.

    Speaking of which, I asked the question, "how do we know the type of an argument" based on my knowledge of C, where variables are declared with a type, such as "Int". Now I understand that variables in Python are not declared with a type - or at least that appears to be the case from a very cursory look at things. I guess I'll figure out along the way how that works. In C, if you reference the wrong variable type when calling a function, that results in a compiler error that is explicitly called out. Not sure what happens when you plug in a real number in a Python / Marionette function that needs an integer.


  5. rDesign, this is a bug that occurs whenever you edit a crop in a viewport. You have to toggle the preference back to "Screen plane only" whenever you edit a crop. Already reported as a bug, and there may be other operations that cause this.

    Alan, I've been doing 3d in VW for 25 years, and I NEVER use layer plane objects. Never saw the need for them, given that we can create 3d polys that are much more versatile, except for not being able to show 2d graphical qualities. I can't foresee ever needing that. Screen objects are much more useful, given that they are aligned to the screen regardless of your point of view, and as I've pointed out before, screen plane 2d objects are part of the original unique genius of VW when it was MiniCAD.


  6. Mike, awesome! Just to be clear, MH, Mike means when you have double-clicked on the symbol and it shows up rotated in its edit space, you use a command to activate the Top/Plan view, and the symbol will rotate to it's normal orientation. Mike, it looks from the behavior of the screen as though VW is actually accomplishing this through the "rotate view" algorithm. The beauty is that you can still see other objects in normal edit space to work on the symbol in context.


  7. Jonathan's got the answer. Make sure every point you want to move is in the multiple-reshape marquee. I often use the "tab" to bring up the floating data bar (you may have different settings for data bar visibility), tab again to go to the "L" field, enter the distance you want, press "Enter", then hold shift to constrain to the direction you want to move.


  8. Reference the external file layers in separate viewports in separate DL layers. Then you can create Sheet Layer viewports that selectively show any combination of layers from the external files, and manipulate class visibility and graphic overrides layer per layer. Duplicate viewports in DLs in order to show the same external layer differently in different Sheet Layer viewports. Not too difficult or time consuming to do.

    Once you set up one reference viewport in a Design Layer, duplicate the layer and change the layers visible in the new viewport, etc. Name layers in such a way as to track the content.

 

7150 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, Maryland 21046, USA   |   Contact Us:   410-290-5114

 

© 2018 Vectorworks, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Vectorworks, Inc. is part of the Nemetschek Group.

×
×
  • Create New...