Jump to content

Creating 2D Symbols vs 3D


Recommended Posts

Make sure the 2D geometry is assigned to the screen plane.  If you edit the 3D geometry, what ever you assign to the screen plane will go into the 2D part of the symbol.  Keep in mind that if there is ANYTHING in the 2D part of the symbol, none of the 3D will display in top/plan view.

Easy way to have labels, etc.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Thanks everyone, but this is still unclear to me. From the start of the video, the 1st symbol created reads as a 2D in the Object Info Pallet. I created the two symbols in the attached file over the course of a project... one is 2D and the other 3D. However, I believe I take the same steps every time I create a symbol.

 

SYMBOLS - TEST.vwx

Edited by CW2020
Link to comment

Three types of symbols. 2D, 3D and Hybrid.

 

2D symbols contain only Screen Plane objects.

 

3D symbols contain zero Screen Plane objects.

 

Hybrid objects contain both Screen Plane and other objects. The Screen Plane objects are shown when in Top/Plan view.  All other objects are hidden in Top/Plan. In any other view the Screen Plane objects are hidden and the other objects are shown.

  • Like 3
Link to comment

Sorry I'm so slow to "get this," Pat. For background, this came up when a client commented to me I had different iBeam symbols... some of which were 3D and some were 2D in the same file (note everything drafted is in Top/Plan). He went on to say that he could not snap to the 3D iBeams. Firstly, I have no issues snapping and seeing curser cues to the 3D iBeams (I attached a file of the iBeams). Regardless, when I select an iBeam (new) from the Tool Set it's in 2D and I wouldn't even know how to convert it to 3D because I don't need to do that. Yet, several of my iBeams are clearly in 3D. So as a test, I made a number of passes at making new symbols (including following the video above and others) and when finished I could see that they're ALL 3D symbols in the Object Info Pallet. So again I don't understand how to create a 2D-specific symbol.

 

Also (FYI), you stated that "The Screen Plane objects are shown when in Top/Plan view." I trust your knowledge and experience, but I was taught to keep all objects for Top/Plan view on the Layer Plane for the exact reason explained in this VWX issued video.

 

I think ultimately, I need to dig deeper into this... 

 

SYMBOLS - TEST 2.vwx

Link to comment

Yes, I get the parametric objects vs symbols, but as far as there 2D/3D existence I perceived a correlation.

 

That said, and getting back to my first upload and question, why is it that when I create a symbol in Top/Plan on the Layer Plane it results in a 3D symbol? In the attached, I drafted two objects and then created a symbol using the same technique I always use and the ones used in video instructions. But why are they 3D? I'm also including a screenshot of my VWX window, but it's standard... no customization.

 

And again, to all of you, this is me simply not getting it... I'm certain you're all correct.

Screen Shot 2021-09-01 at 4.09.17 PM.png

SYMBOLS - TEST 3.vwx

Link to comment

The Layer Plane is 3D.  Only Screen Plane is 2D.  

 

So anything on the layer plane lays on the floor.  

 

In a symbol:

 

Screen Plane = 2D.  If there is only Screen Plane (2D) geometry the symbol has a little 2 subscript to the right of it.

Layer Plane or 3D Plane (or 3D Object) = 3D.  IF there is only 3D geometry then the symbol has a little 3 subscript to the right of it.

 

If it has both 2D and 3D, then the 2D shows in Top/Plan and the 3D shows in all other views.

 

In your example, edit the symbol and change the circle from the Symbol Definition Plane (3D) to Screen Plane.  Then you will only see the circle in top/plan and the rectangle in all other views.

 

If the Screen plane was active when you drew those shapes it would have been a 2D symbol

 

 

Not sure if that answers your question 🙂

  • Like 1
Link to comment
7 minutes ago, michaelk said:

 

If the Screen plane was active when you drew those shapes it would have been a 2D symbol

I think this is the crux of it. You’re active plane when you made the 3D symbols was prob the layer plane and for the 2d symbols you were prob working in screen plane.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Thanks! That makes sense. All of this is sorta new on me, as it's never been an issue.

 

I still need to research the Layer Plane/Screen Planes though, as I'm fairly certain I was taught to draft on Layer Plane if working in 2D... after all, when you open a new file it defaults to Layer Plane and Top/Plan... and that video I shared above (

) makes sense to me. Even the screenshot of the video reads that the Layer Plane should be "2D Top/Plan View."

 

Thanks again everyone! You're all appreciated!

Link to comment

That's a big help, Evan. I can't say it enough though, having been taught the Layer Plane is your 2D Top/Plan plane, it's counterintuitive to consider the Screen Plane applies to 2D objects. When you/someone looks at the image above for the video, the Layer Plane is clearly 2D flat on the layer. I'm not even clear (only because I don't work with it) in what application one would want an object flat on my "screen" as shown in the image above and that video... maybe for a "working" plane. In fact, are you saying I should be drafting floor plans on the Screen Plane and not the Layer Plane?

Link to comment

Apart from it's use for 2d symbols the only other value I see in using screen plane is in 3d views where I use the unified view setting to not show screen objects. For that reason I tend to put 2d stuff on the screen plane so that when I go to a 3d view I can just see my 3d model uncluttered by a whole lot of 2d/planar stuff.

 

So, as far as I can see, if your are working in 2d, then I don't think it matters if you draft on the layer plane or the screen plane, or a mixture of both as they both look the same in top/plan view. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong on this!

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Also checking measurements in 3D views.  If you need to double check the height of a ridge beam or the headroom from a stair tread while in front, back, left, or right view it's nice to be in Screen Plane so you don't click on a random object in the background and get nonsense measurements.

Link to comment
22 hours ago, CW2020 said:

That's a big help, Evan. I can't say it enough though, having been taught the Layer Plane is your 2D Top/Plan plane, it's counterintuitive to consider the Screen Plane applies to 2D objects. When you/someone looks at the image above for the video, the Layer Plane is clearly 2D flat on the layer. I'm not even clear (only because I don't work with it) in what application one would want an object flat on my "screen" as shown in the image above and that video... maybe for a "working" plane. In fact, are you saying I should be drafting floor plans on the Screen Plane and not the Layer Plane?

 

So it's weird and frankly, VW hasn't made it any easier to understand.  This is the number one thing that confuses my students and clients as they are getting comfortable in the software.

 

I think for basic 2d drafting, it is a good idea to stick to layer plane as it is predictable in how it lays on the ground as expected.  If you have the "Convert layer plane objects to screen plane" checkbox checked in your symbol setup dialogue box, then you don't have to think about it.  2d objects will convert to 2d symbols and 3d objects will convert to 3d symbols as expected.  Hybrids are somewhere in the middle as my video shows.

 

Screen plane is very useful to me in my 3d solid modeling - for example, if I want to draw a wall or vertical LED screen for a show, I will usually flip to front view or right view and draw my profile and then extrude it in that view - layer plane wouldn't let me do that.  I don't always just draw a plan and extrude up - lots of times I draw an object from the front or side and then push it into 3d.  So it has its place and usage.

 

What becomes confusing is that there is also 3d plane, working plane, symbol definition plane, screen aligned plane, and automatic mode for some drawing tools - so this is the part that really trips people up and I understand the frustration.  The more you work with it the more you will be able to predict the unpredictability and work through it.

Edited by EAlexander
  • Like 3
Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...