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charlottecreature

Object not working like an object?

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Hi there,

I'm relatively new to Vectorworks so this is probably me missing a step.

I'm currently having an issue with image fill and an object. I'm able to apply an image fill but it doesn't appear on any of the objects sides.

My suspicion is that somehow I haven't classified the object as an object? I mainly think this because when I double click my perfectly working wall I see all of the objects sides as editable. But when I double click on the flats (I'm doing a design for a horror mockumentory) I'm only able to edit the bottom shape that I originally extruded from.

Do I need to somehow edit the properties or "Add Surface" I'm not sure how to fix this.

 

I've added pictures of what I mean by the double click not showing the surfaces as editable.

Screen Shot 2019-10-17 at 1.34.25 pm.png

Screen Shot 2019-10-17 at 1.34.42 pm.png

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image fills are for 2D geometry.

 

You're looking for Renderworks textures.  If you select a 3D object and click the Texture tab in the Object Info Palette you can apply textures.  Check out Renderworks Textures in help or online videos.

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Just to expand on Michael's comments, Image Fills only work with 2D Objects (and probably a few edge cases). For putting images on 3D objects you do need to create Renderworks Textures.

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@Pat Stanford @michaelk  Thanks for your help. I managed to get my textures in and working. I did end up with one crash (it was really weird actually, I didn't get a wheel of death instead the whole system froze and a weird ticking noise started) luckly I had auto save on so didn't loss to much. I actually used less image work then I thought I would because I found the image became a bit to busy to quickly. But overall managed a sucessful set mock up!

 

Attached finished screen shots 🙂

Screen Shot 2019-10-17 at 4.07.46 pm.png

Screen Shot 2019-10-17 at 4.09.41 pm.png

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Nicely done.  

 

You will find that VW is happier if you make the images smaller.  You CAN throw a huge pixel image into a renderworks texture, but it's not necessary.  Depending on your computer, things will run faster with a renderworks texture made with a smaller image.

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On 10/17/2019 at 6:33 PM, michaelk said:

Nicely done.  

 

You will find that VW is happier if you make the images smaller.  You CAN throw a huge pixel image into a renderworks texture, but it's not necessary.  Depending on your computer, things will run faster with a renderworks texture made with a smaller image.

This begs the question: what determines the optimal image size to create textures with?

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20 hours ago, mjm said:

This begs the question: what determines the optimal image size to create textures with?

 

It all depends on how close the texture will be seen in renderings. If a 300dpi image texture is only seen in 300dpi renderings at 1/4 of its original size (resolution), you might get by with reducing it to 75dpi. However, I'd probably reduce it to 150 to give a little wiggle room.

 

The best way to get a feel for this is to experiment:

  1. Take a copy of a file with a rendered viewport rendered at the max resolution you plan to use.
  2. Copy and crop the viewport to a very small portion of the model to show only the texture you're concerned with and turn off any needed layers and classes to help it render faster.
  3. Render the cropped viewport
  4. Copy/paste a copy of the viewport next to the original
  5. Save the file
  6. Reduce the resolution of the texture's image to what you think might be a good minimum.
  7. Update the duplicate viewport and compare the image quality to the original.
  8. Revert the file back to the last saved version and repeat steps 6-7 until you find the smallest dpi that is not noticeably worse then the original. Once you find it, you may want to bump it up a bit in case you create another rendering that needs a little more detail. 

Also, save a file with the original textures at their full resolution in case you even need to go back to them.

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2 hours ago, Matt Panzer said:

 

It all depends on how close the texture will be seen in renderings. If a 300dpi image texture is only seen in 300dpi renderings at 1/4 of its original size (resolution), you might get by with reducing it to 75dpi. However, I'd probably reduce it to 150 to give a little wiggle room.

 

The best way to get a feel for this is to experiment:

  1. Take a copy of a file with a rendered viewport rendered at the max resolution you plan to use.
  2. Copy and crop the viewport to a very small portion of the model to show only the texture you're concerned with and turn off any needed layers and classes to help it render faster.
  3. Render the cropped viewport
  4. Copy/paste a copy of the viewport next to the original
  5. Save the file
  6. Reduce the resolution of the texture's image to what you think might be a good minimum.
  7. Update the duplicate viewport and compare the image quality to the original.
  8. Revert the file back to the last saved version and repeat steps 6-7 until you find the smallest dpi that is not noticeably worse then the original. Once you find it, you may want to bump it up a bit in case you create another rendering that needs a little more detail. 

Also, save a file with the original textures at their full resolution in case you even need to go back to them.

@Matt PanzerAwesome workflow, thank you. I do hope you post this or similar in the knowledgebase.

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1 hour ago, mjm said:

@Matt PanzerAwesome workflow, thank you. I do hope you post this or similar in the knowledgebase.

 

You're welcome! I can direct this to the right people. I don't know if we have an article on ways to keep file sizes manageable but, if not, that would be a good one.

 

Along those lines: Here's great (and simple) way to quickly find which textures are taking up too much precious space in your files:

  1. Select all of your textures in the Resource Manager
  2. Right-click on one and choose the "Extract Image(s)…" command.
    This will export the image used for the textures so you can see how big the file currently is.
    If you sort your Finder window of the file by size, you'll get a good idea of which could benefit from being reduced.

 

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1 hour ago, michaelk said:

Matt

 

Great idea!  

 

^^+++

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