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Haydenovative

Lighting Instrument Removes Global Lighting

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Hi Team,

 

I've posted regarding this before, but I cant find a current thread so please redirect me if there is already a discussion on this. 

 

Adding any lighting fixture to a drawing removes the global lighting regardless of whether or not that light is turned on. This is frustrating in renders where we would like to see the lights hanging in the roof without necessarily turning them on and focussing them. There is a few tricks we use to get around this such as duplicating the lighting layer and converting to 3D polygons and then turning off the original lighting layer. or putting a lot of Renderworks lights through the scene. There was mention of this becoming something that could be toggled on or off. Has anyone seen any progress with this in 2019? Thanks in advance.

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Any time you add a render light or object creating a render light (like a lighting device), Vectorworks assumes you are lighting with intention and turns off the virtual worklight. 

 

If you want more general light in the scene, you have two strategies. One is to add in some render lights (in the Visualization tool set). I like using one or two directional lights with shadows turned off. 

 

You can also edit the lighting options from the  View menu, and increase the amount of ambient light in the scene. 

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@JBenghiat Thanks for that. I do usually add work lights as you mentioned, and upping the ambient light creates an odd new effect rather than a straight correction, it tends to wash out the facets of things in open GL. I would really like to toggle off the assumption that I am lighting with intention or at least not remove general lighting until one of the fixtures is turned on. We do so much lighting work within a greater production that does not require focusing and illumination, it really becomes an annoyance to need to have all the light layers turned off while working on the model.

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As you noticed, the ambient light really just raises the black point in the drawing, so not always ideal.  Turning on ambient occlusion can enhance the look significantly.

 

The behavior of the global light has been this way for years, and may even be a necessity of OpenGL rendering, so this probably won't change any time soon.  I recommend setting up your work lights either as a symbol that you can easily drop in from your favorites library or a layer that you can import from a library file.  The advantage to having the lights in their own layer is that you can quickly toggle them on and off with the Nav palette instead of going to the Visualization palette.

 

A shadowless directional light at 45/45 is going to have an almost identical effect to the global light, with the exception that the global light always comes from over your left shoulder regardless of the view orientation.

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On 12/9/2018 at 7:33 PM, Haydenovative said:

upping the ambient light creates an odd new effect rather than a straight correction, it tends to wash out the facets of things in open GL. I would really like to toggle off the assumption that I am lighting with intention or at least not remove general lighting until one of the fixtures is turned on. We do so much lighting work within a greater production that does not require focusing and illumination, it really becomes an annoyance to need to have all the light layers turned off while working on the model.

This.

Can't we just toggle it off / on?

How hard would that be to add?

It's no different than turning the layer off and on?

I'm going to submit a wishlist request. I suggest others do the same to get this in front of the developers

 

Wihslist thread here

 

 

Edited by Mickey

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So was looking for a solution to this exact problem, and here's a quick hack. If you drop a helidon anywhere in the same layer as your lighting fixtures, it will essentially replace the ambient lighting at more or less the same values. It's not *exactly* the same but it's pretty close.

 

Just make sure shadows are turned off on your OpenGL rendering settings.

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Yes I can second this. Attached are some photos of @JBenghiat's Beam Viz Beams and you can see the difference between them with a Helidon and without. 

 

Screen Shot 2019-09-22 at 1.54.39 PM.jpg

Screen Shot 2019-09-22 at 1.55.13 PM.jpg

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40 minutes ago, Bradley King said:

So was looking for a solution to this exact problem, and here's a quick hack. If you drop a helidon anywhere in the same layer as your lighting fixtures, it will essentially replace the ambient lighting at more or less the same values. It's not *exactly* the same but it's pretty close.

 

Just make sure shadows are turned off on your OpenGL rendering settings.

 

If you want a lighter weight solution, go to the Visualization tool set, find the render light tool, select the directional light mode (the one that looks like a sun), and insert anywhere in the drawing. In Object Info, you can turn off Cast Shadows, so that you don’t need to turn off Cast Shadows in OpenGL (useful if you’re looking at gobos or rendered shutter in BeamViz 😏). The default azimuth and elevation should be 45/45, but if not, set that as well.

 

The only difference between the shadowless directional light and the default render light is that it doesn’t stay oriented to your screen. If you want to add a little more fill from the opposite direction, you can mirror the light and bring down its intensity in the OIP.

 

To speed this up in the future, select the light (or lights) and create a symbol. Add the symbol to your go-to library. Alternatively, you can have the render light in a layer by itself, and add this layer to your template or Standards file. Import the layer to new drawings, selecting the option to include objects. This method is advantageous if you want easy control of of the light, as render lights are mastered by their layer or class. Simply toggle the layer on and off to control the global light.

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I always have a class called “Ambient Light” and one called Ambient Realistic” in my default template and in each class is a light object, more or less as J mentioned above. You can toggle these on and off at will and are in every drawing I do. I use the “realistic” ambient to simulate  the ambient light emanating from stage. To either bolster the reflected light in a render.

 

You should spend a little time with this to dial in what works best for you. Also note, when rendering from sheet layers, that you can set the overall lighting value per viewport which can be very helpful with OpenGL renders.  

 

Mildly off topic, the sheet layer DPI makes a HUGE difference in the quality of OpenGL renders.  I generally set for at least 600dpi (sometimes as high as 1200dpi) for OpenGL white model renders. 

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44 minutes ago, scottmoore said:

Mildly off topic, the sheet layer DPI makes a HUGE difference in the quality of OpenGL renders.  I generally set for at least 600dpi (sometimes as high as 1200dpi) for OpenGL white model renders. 

 

And keep in mind this goes hand-in-hand with the literal size of your viewport. The number of pixels rendered is a product of the viewport size and the raster DPI.

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44 minutes ago, Andy Broomell said:

 

And keep in mind this goes hand-in-hand with the literal size of your viewport. The number of pixels rendered is a product of the viewport size and the raster DPI.

This is another topic that I’ll jump into soon. 

 

“Camera dpi vs sheet layer dpi vs image export dpi”. Unless there is already a great thread on this subject. If so, I would love to see that. 

 

Always appreciate you insight sir!!

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