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Creating 2D Plans from 3D Model

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Hi All,

 

I've reached the point where I'm trying to extract some 2D images from our first full 3D modelled project. I've done a bit of googling around but can't find any clear definitive advice about how to create 2D plans. Also it would be good to know any potential pitfalls or things to watch out for when modelling to achieve good 2D plan results..

 

As far as I can tell there are two options:

 

1- Make a viewport in the Traditional 2D way, as previously done when drawing in 2D. i.e. when creating a second floor plan, only the '2nd floor plan' layer would be turned on in the viewport. Any info from layers below (i.e. a ground floor roof, a Staircase drawn on the 1st Floor layer but which arrives at the 2nd floor plan) would have to be drawn on separately. Not ideal or very 'Smart' really, could end up with some inconsistencies.

 

2- Make a Section Cut viewport using either a) the section cut viewport tool, or b) using the clipping cube tool. The whole model would be turned on, so elements from below will appear. Care would have to be taken to get a good 'clipping' distance. Advantage is that it could show information from below, such as lower level roof structures or double height spacers. But this can include information you don't want to see sometimes. For instance, in a second floor plan I may see some outwards opening door swings from the ground floor plan below protruding out.

 

Any advice from some of you seasoned 3D pros would be great!

 

Thanks,

A

 

 

Edited by Asemblance
Clarity & Conciseness

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Hi All - quick bump here I'm still unsure how to move forwards with setting up our 2D plans!

 

Thanks,

A

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A couple comments: 1) Use Classes to turn certain items on/off in any particular VP. (EG: the roof eave line can be in it's own class) 2) To show Stairs from level below, either a) create a second stair in the second level and move it down so that it aligns in 3d with the stair below; and/or b) if you have a Floor in the upper level, cut a hole in the floor (just like in real life) so that the stair below shows...

 

There is so much 'meat' to this topic it's hard time-wise to give you a comprehensive how-to. But those two tips might help.

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Hi @CipesDesign,

 

Thanks for getting back. The main thing I'm trying to determine, is which of the 2 options I outlined above is best for creating 2D plans. What you have described would work for option 2 - for instance cutting a hole in the slab to show stairs below. I guess I'll need to take a couple of screenshots to illustrate what I'm asking..

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Both are problematic, unfortunately, and there really isn't a good solution (at the moment).  Which is why the responses have not been all that helpful. 

 

In general, plans look best when you work with parametric types of objects (walls, floors, slabs, pillars, etc).  These objects have a 2d and 3d component associated with them, which makes them read well in Top Plan Views.  That said, parametric objects also tend to behave very idiosyncratically in a 3d modeling environment.  While they are extremely useful, and they have their place in the workflow, they also become problematic when trying to express complicated design ideas.  Walls need to get stacked to read correctly at various layer heights.  Wall openings are a nightmare.  Multi-story elements also present difficulties and require class/layer organizational strategies like the one Cipes Design mentioned above. 

 

In terms of design, it is often quicker and more intuitive to work with 3d objects and shapes, like generic solids.  The problem is that once you move into the realm of 3d Modeling, Vectorworks ceases to deal with 2d representations of this work all that easily.  3d objects like Solids, Meshes or Nurbs do not have an associated 2d representation, and as a result, they cannot have hatches or fills without converting them into Autohybrids (which I don't recommend as a workaround.)

 

In the 3d modeling paradigm, orthogonal drawings require horizontal or vertical section cuts, and the viewports need to constantly be updated or rendered.  Time is wasted rendering, and fussing with the technical aspects of the section viewport dialogue box.   Unfortunately, there is also no way to convert certain solid objects back into parametric ones, such as walls.

 

Hopefully this will change in future releases.  But maybe this is just our lot in life to deal with.

 

 

830250503_ScreenShot2018-06-19at10_23_39AM.thumb.png.03fb1ae3f58fbc9b9114d405c85571a9.png

Edited by cberg
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Thanks for everyones responses so far. I've created a couple of screenshots to illustrate the type of issue I'm running into with each of the 2 methods I outlined..

 

As you can see, in this particular instance the conflict is between door swings from the level below which I don't want to see, and a mezzanine below in a double height space/void, which I do want to see.

 

1246640563_2DdrawingMethod1.thumb.jpg.164d159f8e11f3bc0fb37ae79a8416a4.jpg

1708516513_2DdrawingMethod2.thumb.jpg.a4d005cf8ea24039887953a58f320cca.jpg

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Solution 1 (easiest/fastest/dirtiest): Use masking objects in the Annotations (white rectangle, with white lines and black line at the wall) [sometimes you just gotta do it]. Solution 2: Create a discreet Class for the doors on the lower (slab) level. Then make that Class invisible in the VP shown.

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