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Bruce Kieffer

Softer Shadows

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Congratulations! Sorry that it was so confusing. I've been wrestling with RW for a while now and, after many many visits to this forum and many hours futzing around, I finally feel like I have a reasonable understanding of how things work.

The class attributes are standard VW except for the few fills that I changed for the rendering.

My countertop is a floor because:

1. The countertop component of the cabinet object shows lines between each cabinet when rendered with hidden line.

2. The floor object is really easy to punch holes in. Just Edit Group, draw a polygon in the shape of the hole that you want, exit the Edit, and voila, a hole. You can also easily make an L-shaped floor.

The down side to using a floor in 2008 is that you can't apply textures to the floor's edges.

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Because I checked "Black and White Only" in the SLVP's Advanced Properties.

ANOTHER reason to use SLVPs.

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Hi All,

I am running into the issue Bruce was having with softer shadows as well. I have taken islandmond's suggestion below except for "roughed bump texture" as I am not sure how to apply this to a simple painted wall? I have posted the image. I have a 25W incandescent bulb with light brightness at 50% that is creating an extremely sharp hot spot?? Not sure why. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Jeremy

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Custom Renderworks Options> Lighting>Shadow Mapped Shadows>High

Sample Quality > High

It also helps to use a rough bumped texture for the the shadows to fall on to.

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I think that the hot spot is a result of Renderworks' "single-bounce" rendering. Light only bounces once so you don't get the diffuse light that we see in reality. I suspect that using Final Gather in Custom Renderworks will help soften things up a bit but it will certainly add time to the render. Your other alternative is to further dim the light bulb until the hot spot goes away.

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billtheia,

I was already using Final Gather in CR. I did turn down the 25w bulbs to 10% & got an acceptable result. Not sure then how a room is "accurately lighted" using fixtures & bulb wattages whereby I will need to tone them each down to avoid hotspots?? At any rate the result is good enough for what I was doing.

TY, Jeremy

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"Accurately lighted" is much more difficult than it appears. Most rendering software has to play games with lighting to give results that LOOK GOOD and are generated in the shortest possible time. AND, the output looks different on different monitors and from different printers.

Ultimately, I think of rendering software as a tool to help me get my point across NOT a way to determine accurate lighting levels.

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billtheia, Agreed. My comment had to do with if 25w,60w, 75w, etc. bulbs are available within the program then there must be a way to use them to full effect.

Thanks, Jeremy

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