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mr. iagea

editing a roof face object

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I have a very simple roof system that I'm trying to get correct.

Referring to the two images attached, the left roof's peak extends past the axis of its eave ends. When I created the roof plane, I got the resulting vertical sides (fascias). I'd like the fascias to angle inward, giving the roof a more "prow-like" appearance.

I tried editing the roof plane using the 3D Reshape Tool, but I cannot seem to get at the "thickness" of the shape and move the lower vertex inward. The help files and manual are, of course, no help.

I know this is possible. Ideas?

Thanks!

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How did you create these roof faces? Whether rightly or wrongly, I stick to turning 2D polygons of a roof plan into roof faces (via AEC -> Roof Face...) and have never come across this problem.

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That's exactly the way I built them.

I created 2D polygons first, then used the AEC> Roof Face command.

I am not happy with the AEC > Create Roof command, as it failed to create the roof I wanted as easily.

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I know what you mean. I had the same problem, but I changed my working method, and all is fine now:

I use two roof faces above each other. One for the finishing and one for the structure. The finishing has a rectangular one side edge and the structure has a vertical and a horizontal edge. That way the roof is drawn more to reality.

You will notice that the finishing will not always has the correct edge, but this is not a problem. I found out how the program is thinking: All roof edges under the roofline you draw, will have the chosen ending, all roof edges above the roofline will not. So if the roof ending is not correct, move the roofline. Take a look at the added image.

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Nice catch, I ran into that above below roofline issue and ended up faking it because of deadlines, shocking I know.

Thanks for the tip it is a good one.

ion

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Hmm. OK, I get what you mean about creating a double roof, and that certainly has me thinking about other things that I could be doing to this roof system.

I see how you've placed your axes in different locations and that has resulted in different edge angles. I thought the axis placement was the point from which the roof elevations are determined. That is to say, the axis point (line) stays at the elevation where it's drawn relative to the Z of its design layer, and everything else moves accordingly (the high "up" and the low side "down"). Maybe I'm misunderstanding the use of the command, and I just need to play around with it some more.

I guess I'm not quite following how the two different axes placements in your example creates the difference I'm seeking. Can you explain how your sandwich is a roof plane (as in, which way is the peak?)

I need my acute fascia angle to be on the gable end rather than the eave end.

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Hey Charlie,

You may get into a "solid subtraction" scenario where you use an extrude to subtract a bit of the roof at an angle, thus creating that beveled rake.

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I see how you've placed your axes in different locations and that has resulted in different edge angles. I thought the axis placement was the point from which the roof elevations are determined. That is to say, the axis point (line) stays at the elevation where it's drawn relative to the Z of its design layer, and everything else moves accordingly (the high "up" and the low side "down"). Maybe I'm misunderstanding the use of the command, and I just need to play around with it some more.

I guess I'm not quite following how the two different axes placements in your example creates the difference I'm seeking. Can you explain how your sandwich is a roof plane (as in, which way is the peak?)

I need my acute fascia angle to be on the gable end rather than the eave end.

You got it right about the roof line. It should be where the wall is, but you can replace it to get different effects.

For the roof: I have 4 roof planes in the drawing. The red ones and the brown ones. That's how the picture is created. The roof goes up from left to right.

I find it better to draw like it is built, so it's more logical to use two roof planes, and it solves a lot of problem.

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@Dieter: Ah! OK, I see it now. Thanks for that. I will play around and see what I get.

@Wes: Is that possible? Can I change my roof face object to a simple 3D object and reshape it more completely that way? That is what made sense to me at first, but I couldn't figure out how to do it. I expect that once I make that change, I'll lose the roof face functionality of that object.

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IMO, better than corrupting your roof face with subtract solids is to use the double roof face approach, holding the lower surface back a bit from the gable edge, and then using an extrude-along-path (with ends appropriately split/trimmed/subtracted to blend) for the bevelled gable fascia. You'll need to fuss with the profile alignment, but it'll do what you want.

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I agree with Chad, yes you can modify the roof as I've suggested but yes, you'll end up with a solid subtraction/addition rather than a roof face.

The idea of adding a fascia/rake/soffit made from an extrude-along-path seems to be a nice idea.

I've also gone over to the "double roof" concept for several reasons as well.

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